How Intel Turbo Boost Works

1026-1 

As all knows, hystou latest mini computer core i5, i7 and palm-sized celeron quad core mini pc cpu all with Turbo Boost technology, some buyer ask how to set up and use this Turbo Boost function. Here we make explaination about Turbo Boost Technology.

What is Intel® Turbo Boost Technology?
Intel® Turbo Boost Technology is a way to automatically run the processor core faster than the noted frequency. The processor must be working in the power, temperature, and specification limits of the thermal design power (TDP). This results in increased performance of both single and multi-threaded applications.

How Intel Turbo Boost Works?
Intel Turbo Boost monitors the current usage of a Core i5 or i7 processor to determine how close the processor is to the maximum thermal design power, or TDP. The TDP is the maximum amount of power the processor is supposed to use. If the Core i5 or i7 processor sees that it is operating well within limits, Turbo Boost kicks in.

1026-2

Turbo Boost is a dynamic feature. There is no set-in-stone speed which the Core i5 or i7 processor will reach when in Turbo Boost. Turbo Boost operates in 133Mhz increments and will scale up until it either reaches the maximum Turbo Boost allowed (which is determined by the model of processor) or the processor comes close to its maximum TDP. For example, the Core i5 750 has a base clock speed of 2.66GHz but has a maximum Turbo Boost speed of 3.2GHz.
However, Intel still advertises these processors by their base clock speed. This is because Intel does not guarantee that a processor will ever hit its maximum Turbo Boost speed. I have yet to hear of an Intel processor which can’t hit its maximum Turbo Boost speed, but hitting the maximum Turbo Boost is dependent on workload “ it won’t happen all of the time.”

Why Turbo Boost Rocks?
Despite Turbo Boost’s lack of predictability, it is still an excellent feature. It provides a solution to the problem of compromising between dual and quad core processors.
Before Turbo Boost the choice of purchasing a dual core or quad core processor was a compromise. Dual core processors were clocked faster than quad core processors simply because having more cores increases power consumption and heat generation. Some programs, like games, favored dual core processors, while other programs, like 3D rendering software, favored quad cores. If you used both types of applications you had to make a choice about which was most important to you. You couldn’t receive maximum performance in both from a single processor.
Turbo Boost gets rid of this compromise. If you use the Core i5 750 in a 3D rendering application it will probably only operate at its base clock speed because all four cores will be used. However, if you use the Core i5 750 with a game which only needs two cores “ presto!” – the third and fourth cores go into a low power state and the two cores you’re actually using are running at a clock speed as fast as what you’d expect from a standard dual core processor.